A Magnum Opus

Has been birthed by one of our very best biblical theologians, one who has truly taken upon himself the mantle of Geerhardus Vos. I can’t wait to get my hands on it. Especially appealing to me is the focus on the New Testament’s use of the Old Testament, surely the most thorny problem in biblical theology, and one to which the author has devoted a great deal of his time.

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15 Comments

  1. Greg said,

    November 15, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    I have been waiting all summer for this book. Ordered my copy this morning.

  2. November 15, 2011 at 5:50 pm

    Thanks for the heads-up, Lane! Ordering my copy as I type this.

  3. David Gadbois said,

    November 15, 2011 at 6:29 pm

    I’ve seen him speak before at Kim Riddlebarger’s church, and I know that his commentary on Revelation is highly regarded. I see he is Congregational (CCCC), but does he strike you as self-conciously covenantal in his approach, baptistic, or something else?

  4. greenbaggins said,

    November 15, 2011 at 8:15 pm

    David, he is most definitely covenantal in his approach. I don’t think they would have hired him at WTS if he had been otherwise! But I know from having read two of his books, both outstanding (The Temple and the Church’s Mission and We Become What We Worship) that he is Vossian through and through, and therefore covenantal.

  5. David Gadbois said,

    November 15, 2011 at 11:59 pm

    Gotcha. I didn’t know he was at WTS, last I heard he was at Wheaton.

  6. Cris D. said,

    November 16, 2011 at 9:02 am

    My copy arrived yesterday (I manage our church’s “book table” and added this for myself!). The book runs to over 1000 pages. It carries a dedication to the late Meredith Kline (as well as others, David Wells and memory fails me for the 3rd person named).

    Chapter 3 is the sample in .PDF at WTS Books. The 1st footnote to ch. 3 refers to Vos, Eschatology of the OT and the 3rd note refers to MGK’s Kingdom Prologue.

    I am the leader for one of our Wednesday night Home Studies (Hebrews this year), and I’m tempted to resign to free up my reading schedule!

  7. Frank Aderholdt said,

    November 16, 2011 at 11:47 am

    45% off until November 23rd at http://www.wtsbooks.com!

  8. Jonathan Bonomo said,

    November 16, 2011 at 5:26 pm

    David,

    GKB went to WTS from Wheaton a couple years ago. As all profs there must, he had to sign a pledge submitting to the Westminster Standards in order to be full time faculty.

  9. November 16, 2011 at 11:57 pm

    Dedicated to Meredith Kline? Is that a good thing?

  10. Robert Berman said,

    November 17, 2011 at 9:08 am

    I’ve gotten much mileage from the “Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament” he co-edited with Don Carson in 2007.

  11. Cris D. said,

    November 17, 2011 at 9:48 am

    Richard: you’re joking, right? Even if you don’t agree with the framework view of Genesis, Meredith G.Kline has made a number of great contributions to exegesis and Biblical Theology. I’ll bet that few of his peers or successors are/were as familiar with the contents of Scripture – in either English or Hebrew (probably Greek as well). To sit in his OT History/Theology lectures was so humbling and inspiring. (MGK was at WTS-PA for a semester in my MDiv days). If one works his way through Kline’s writings, even if not agreeing with everything, one comes out a better theologian for having done so. So back to Dr. Beale:

    Dr. Beale’s dedication in A New Testament Biblical Theology:

    To Meredith G. Kline and Gordon P. Hugenberger, who have helped me to understand better the riches of Old Testament Biblical Theology, and to David F. Wells, who helped me to understand Christology better within an “already and not yet” framework.

    It’s a purely external way of looking at things but based on the author index, Beale is much more indebted to Vos than Von Rad, refers more to Kline than to Eichrodt. There are numerous index entries for Vos, Gaffin, Silva, and Kline, to note some names in our closer circle of influences and mentors, as well as other expected and respected OT and NT scholars.

  12. Roger pennington said,

    November 17, 2011 at 3:32 pm

    Not to mention Robert A. Peterson’s own magnum opus, on the work of Christ:

    http://www.wtsbooks.com/product-exec/product_id/8056/nm/Salvation+Accomplished+by+the+Son%3A+The+Work+of+Christ+%28Hardcover%29

  13. November 17, 2011 at 8:59 pm

    I received my copy today. I read a few quick sections and found them excellent. Beale’s style flows well, fitting the narrative motif of the work.

    I’ve gotten much mileage from the “Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament” he co-edited with Don Carson in 2007.

    Ditto. The cover schemes even match.

  14. jedpaschall said,

    November 18, 2011 at 5:58 pm

    Chris D.

    It’s a purely external way of looking at things but based on the author index, Beale is much more indebted to Vos than Von Rad, refers more to Kline than to Eichrodt. There are numerous index entries for Vos, Gaffin, Silva, and Kline, to note some names in our closer circle of influences and mentors, as well as other expected and respected OT and NT scholars.

    Ding Ding Ding!!! Chris, this is so well said. Beale’s understanding of the OT is frankly as good as many in the field of OT studies, and there has been such a need for scholarly, not to mention conservative and Reformed work on the use on the NT’s use of the New. Everything that Beale has written recently, from his Revelation commentary, The Temple and the Church’s Mission, Commentary on the New Testament’s Use of the Old Testament (edited), and now this most recent New Testament Theology (which I haven’t picked up), exude a biblical-theological mastery of both Testaments.

    I haven’t read Schriner’s NT theology, but I have heard good things about it. However, I did work through Thielman’s, and it was a worthy work as well. But, what Thielman’s lacked was in his ability to tie his NT theological formulations back to the OT, which is something Beale truly excels in. Beale’s NT theology just might be the best of the recent NT theologies to come out, and if it is anything like his prior work, it is probably as proficient in OT theology as Waltke and Goldsworthy, while adhering better within the bounds of Reformed Orthodoxy than these do (at times).

    Eichrodt, Von Rad, and Childs, along with all the other Barthian and Dialectical theologians have done more harm than good in the field of OT theology and exegesis. They represent a school of thought that wants to have their cake and eat it too, by buying in hook-line-and sinker to the radical reconstruction of biblical “history” by 19th and 20th century critical scholars, but want to do so under the guise of a zombified form of ‘biblical’ orthodoxy. I’ve plowed through my fair share of Von Rad and Eichrodt, and their brilliance is their undoing, as all of their penetrating insights are built on the shaky foundations of dialectical theology, dripping with neo-Kantianism and Barthian influences. However, Beale’s exegetical chops are in the upper echelon of his field, and he manages to utilize the very best exegetes from the Reformed tradition. I literally cannot wait to read this book.

  15. jedpaschall said,

    November 18, 2011 at 5:59 pm

    Richard,

    Dedicated to Meredith Kline? Is that a good thing?

    Uhhh, yeah, at least from my perspective. Why would this be a bad thing?


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