Great New Resource on Ecclesiastes

Ecclesiastes is a particularly difficult book to interpret. Especially discouraging for the preacher are the seemingly nonsensical, or even apparently heretical statements that Qohelet makes. However, when one comes at it from a presuppositional viewpoint, one can see that what Qohelet is trying to do is to examine what life looks like without God (“under the sun”), to show that it is absurd, and come to the conclusion that God is absolutely necessary in the equation. This commentary has precisely this presuppositional approach. I heard most of his sermons on the book, and this commentary is basically his sermons edited. I highly recommend this resource as a great help to those who would scratch their heads wondering how to preach this book.

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6 Comments

  1. ethomasyoung said,

    April 9, 2010 at 6:54 pm

    This looks like an interesting book. Thanks for the info.!

  2. tim prussic said,

    April 9, 2010 at 8:18 pm

    Looks fantastic!

  3. April 10, 2010 at 12:22 am

    When I got my very first teaching opportunity (for an adult Sunday School class) many years ago, when I was only about 3 or 4 years old in the Lord, I chose to teach through the Book of Ecclesiastes. Let’s just say that it was more of a learning experience for me than it was for the folks in the class – which included a married couple who were in their 90s, if memory serves. It’s an experience I hope to have again, one of these days.

  4. April 18, 2010 at 11:13 pm

    Lane,

    I received Tremper Longman’s commentary as a gift for Christmas and haven’t really checked it out yet. Any thoughts on its merits or lack thereof?

    -Jordan

  5. greenbaggins said,

    April 19, 2010 at 8:44 am

    I do not like Longman’s commentary at all, Jordan. He basically classifies Qohelet as heretical. Longman’s construct makes Ecclesiastes unpreachable.

  6. Phil Derksen said,

    April 19, 2010 at 9:12 am

    Incidentally, Tremper Longman has been pretty vocal in suggesting that Adam was very possibly not a historical person. Enough said for his theological reliability, as far as I’m concerned.


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